Darwin

Darwin

Darwin

The 75 meter long, 1537 dwt cargo vessel Darwin ran aground in the Lillebælt off Årø Island, Denmark.  The Darwin was heading for Kolding from Hamburg with a cargo of sunflower meal when it grounded in shallow water.  No reports of injuries.

The Darwin remained aground as authorities requested diver to inspect the hull for damage.  Reports state the cargo vessel had grounded near a fish farm and authorities were concerned over possible release of pollution.

Divers inspected the hull and found no damage.  The tug Baltsund was dispatched to the scene and pulled the Darwin free.  The Darwin continued on its voyage to Kolding.

KMP Bandeng

KMP Bandeng

KMP Bandeng

On August 15, the ro-ro passenger ferry KMP Bandeng sank in the Molucca Sea near Maju, Indonesia. The ferry had departed on the evening of August 14th from Tobelo bound for Bitung on North Sulawesi with 24 passengers and 18 crew along with 12 vehicles on board.  Several hours into the voyage the ferry contacted authorities.  The captain was concerned as the ferry was proceeding in deteriorating weather and decided to turn back to Tobelo.   

Authorities lost contact with the ferry a short time later.  Unknown to them, the KMP Bandeng had lost power.  The ferry’s main engine had failed and now the vessel was adrift in bad weather.  With swells reaching two to three meters, the KMP Bangdeng suffered water ingress while no power for the vessel’s pumps.  A passenger’s phone was able to contact authorities and alerted them that the vessel was in danger of foundering.  The order to abandon ship was given and 18 passengers and crew went into the vessel’s 3 life rafts.  Another 17 persons on board would be rescued by local fishermen who came to the aid of the KMP Bandeng.  Five people including the captain of the KMP Bandeng were reported as missing.  

Authorities dispatched search and rescue vessel to the scene and brought all survivors back to North Maluku Island.  Many were taken to hospital for treated for minor injuries or dehydration.

 

George H. Ledcor

George H. Ledcor

George H. Ledcor
photo: vancouversun.com

On August 14, the 18 meter long tugboat George H. Ledcor sank on the Fraser River between Vancouver and Richmond, British Columbia, Canada. The tug was towing a gravel barge when it suddenly capsized and sank. The four crew on board were thrown into the water and later rescued by a nearby tug.  No reports of injuries.

A sheen was spotted over the sunken tug as diesel fuel is released. Authorities place booms around the wreck site and divers are dispatched to plug fuel vents on the tugboat. Reports state the George H. Ledcor had nearly 22,000 litres of fuel on board at the time of the sinking. 

A crane barge was dispatched to raise the George H. Ledcor from the bottom. The Canadian Coast Guard has launched an investigation into the incident.