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Tag: North Carolina

Sea Angels

Sea Angels

Sea Angels
Photo: uscg

On December 9, the 88 foot long fishing vessel Sea Angels ran aground in Browns Inlet, North Carolina. The fishing vessel had suffered mechanical failure and went adrift. The crew sent out a distress call requesting assistance from the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard dispatched a 45-foot response boat along with a MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter to the scene and hoisted all four crewmen to safety off the Sea Angels. No reports of injuries.

Authorities state the Sea Angels went ashore in an area used by the United States Marine Corps for live-fire training. Since the 1940s, Browns Inlet has been prohibited due to the presence of unexploded ordnance scattered on the seafloor making salvage extremely dangerous.

Sea Angels
Photo: uscg

Reports state the owners of the Sea Angels has hired a contractor to remove fuel off the fishing vessel.  Authorities estimate 15,000 gallons of diesel fuel needs to be removed off the Sea Angels.

Sarocha Naree

Sarocha Naree

Sarocha Naree
Photo: wwaytv3.com

The 199 meter long, 63046 dwt bulk carrier Sarocha Naree ran aground off Bald Head Island, Cape Fear River, North Carolina. The Sarocha Naree had departed from Wilmington heading out to sea when it grounded in the estuary at low tide. Two tugs were dispatched and were able to refloat the Sarocha Naree on the rising tide. The bulk carrier proceeded to a nearby anchorage for surveys. No reports of injuries, damage or pollution released.

Sea Level

Sea Level

Sea Level
Photo: ncdot.gov

The 50 meter long ro-ro passenger ferry Sea Level ran aground in Bigfoot Slough off Ocracoke Island, North Carolina. The ferry with 16 passengers was headed to Ocracoke from Cedar Island when it slowed as it approached shallow water, but strong winds pushed the ferry onto a sandbar. The vessel remain aground for 3 hours until it was able to free itself on the rising tide. No reports of injuries, damage or pollution released.

The Sea Level proceeded to Ocracoke where it unloaded all the passengers and vehicles on board. Reports state the area is known to have rapid and changing shoals.