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Tag: Pollution

Collision on the Rhine

Collision on the Rhine

 

Maintal
Photo: dw.com

On January 28, the 110 meter long self-propelled tanker-barge Maintal collided with the 105 meter long self-propelled barge Allegro on the Rhine near Zons, Germany. The Maintal was loaded with a cargo of gas oil from Spay when it struck head-on with the Allegro which had 1500 tons of soy on board.  The Maintal sustained hull damage including a rupture to one of its cargo tanks. Some 2000 litres of gas oil was released into the river. The master of the Maintal also sustained minor injuries. The Allegro also sustained significant damage to its bow, but no reports of injuries.

Authorities allowed the vessels to proceed to nearby berths. The Allegro berthed in Cologne and the Maintal berthed at Duisburg.  Authorities placed booms around the Maintal to contain any further pollution released.  The pollution released in the Rhine could not be contained due to the strong currents.  Authorities closed several entrances to ports and canals along the Rhine due to the pollution.

Yamoto

Yamoto

Yamoto
Photo: courrier-picard.fr

On October 26, the 38 meter long self-propelled barge Mac Gyver, loaded with 350 tons of sand, collided with the combination of the 39 meter long self-propelled barge Hijete and barge Yamoto on the Canal du Nord near Eterpigny, France. Both vessels were unable to establish communications before they collided head-on. The Yamoto sustained damage and water ingress at the bow.  Unable to contain the flooding, the local fire brigade was alerted.  They arrived on scene and deployed 3 dewatering pumps trying to keep the barge afloat.  The flooding was too much for the pumps and the Yamoto sank by the bow.  The pumps were pulled off the Yamoto and the entire vessel sank to the bottom of the canal leaving only part of the wheelhouse visible. Authorities laid out booms to contain oil pollution released.  Reports state the Yamoto will be later raised and repaired.

The Mac Gyver and Hijete both sustained some damage, but were in no danger of sinking.

Master D

Master D

Master D
Photo: uscg

On August 30, the 68 foot long, 122 gt fishing vessel Master D caught fire in the Gulf of Mexico near Port Isabel, Texas.  All three crewmen on the Master D were forced to abandoned ship into a life raft as the smoke engulfed the vessel.  Authorities were alerted by an emergency radio beacon from the Master D and diverted the Coast Guard Cutter Coho to the scene. The Coho arrived and safely rescued all three crew members.  No reports of injuries.  

After burning for two days, the Master D sank 58 miles off Port Isabel.  Reports show a light sheen over the wreck location.  The Coast Guard has reported that it will work with a salvage team to remove any diesel fuel or oil pollution released by the fishing vessel. The Master D had some 23,000 gallons of fuel on board at the time of the incident.